The James Joyce Italian Foundation

Dipartimento di di Lingue Letterature e Culture Straniere – Università Roma Tre

Programme of the III James Joyce Graduate Conference, 22-23 January 2010, Dublin – Ireland

The programme for the forthcoming Joyce Graduate Conference is now available. This year, the Conference is organized by The James Joyce Research Centre in collaboration with The James Joyce Italian Foundation and will be held in Dublin, at the Humanities Institute of Ireland, University College Dublin.
The social programme includes a drink in Buswell’s Hotel, 26 Molesworth Street, on Thursday at 20.30; a dinner, at Saagar, 16 Harcourt Street, on Friday at 20.30 and the participation to the play The Seafarer by Conor McPherson, at the Abbey Theatre, on Saturday at 19.30.

FULL PROGRAMME

FRIDAY 22 JANUARY

10.00-11.00 Plenary
Professor Franca Ruggieri (Università di Roma Tre)
Chair: Professor Anne Fogarty
James Joyce: Tradition and the Individual Talent

11.00-11.25 Coffee/Tea Break

11.25- 12.55 Aural/ Visual Joyce (Chair: Dr Catherine Morris, University College Dublin)

Chih-hsien Hsieh (University College Dublin)
“Hark the Written Words”: The Gramophone Motif in Ulysses

Lorna Mellon (Northwestern University, Evanston)
Ulysses and Noise: Controlling and Allowing Chaos

Maria Domenica Mangialavori (Università di Roma Tre)
The Aural and the Visual: Sensory Faculties in “Proteus” and “Wandering Rocks”

David Shackleton (University of Oxford)
“Tableau!”: Photography in Joyce’s “Nausicaa”

12.55-14.30: Lunch

14.30.–15.30 Plenary (Sponsored by the Humanities Institute of Ireland)
Dr Fritz Senn (Zürich James Joyce Foundation)
Chair: Dr Marc Caball (University College Dublin)
Ulysses: Episodic Variety and Coherence

15.30-15.45 Coffee/Tea Break

15.45-17.45 Joyce and Language (Chair: Professor Brian Caraher, Queen’s University, Belfast)

Siobhán Purcell (University College Dublin)
“He seehears lipspeech”: Textual Deafness and Linguistic Deftness in Ulysses and “The Sisters”

Elizabeth Kate Switaj (Queen’s University Belfast)
Joyce, Berlitz, and the Teaching of English as a Foreign Language

William Viney (University of London)
Reading Joyce’s Waste

Sylvain Belluc (Université Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle)
“These heavy sands are language tide and wind have silted here”: Reality, Etymology, and Poetry in “Proteus”

Antonio Bibbò (Università dell’Aquila)
“Haveth catches everywhere”: “Wandering Rocks” and the Birth of Choral Novels

SATURDAY 23 JANUARY

9.00-10.30 Joycean Intertextuality (Chair: Dr Sam Slote, Trinity College Dublin)

Ann Fallon (St Patrick’s College, Drumcondra, Dublin City University)
Joyce’s Naughty Teddy: Ovidian Echoes in “Proteus”

Sonia Buttinelli (Università di Roma Tre)
Joyce’s D’Annunzio: The Influence of the Italian Writer in Joyce’s Early Works

Olga Fernandez Vicente (Universidad di Deusto)
Breaking Boundaries: Baroja the Modernist versus Joyce the Modern

Philip Keel Geheber (Trinity College Dublin)
‘Non-intention’: Cage and Joyce

10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea Break

11.00-13.00 Theorising Joyce (Chair: Dr Sharae Deckard, University College Dublin)

Yi-peng Lai (Queen’s University, Belfast)
“Bloom of Flowerville”: Farmer with the Heart o’ a Nation

Alison Lacivita (Trinity College Dublin)
Finnegans Wake and Ecocriticism

Fabio Luppi (Università di Roma Tre)
Stephen Dedalus, Race, and the Irish Woman

Aingeal Clare (University of York)
“Mocked Majesty”: Games and Authority in Joyce

Camilla Mount (King’s College, London)
Structures of Time in Ulysses and the Newspaper

13.00-14.00 Lunch

14.00.-15.00 Plenary
Dr John McCourt (Università di Roma Tre)
Chair: Dr Luca Crispi
“No Good Story Should be Rejected”: Yeats, Joyce, and the Problematics of Biography

15.15-17.00 Joycean Aesthetics (Chair: TBC)

Richard Barlow (Queen’s University, Belfast)
Joyce and Scotland

Niko Pomakis (Universität Erlangen-Nuremberg)
A Portrait of the Artist as a Reconciler of Opposites: Reading “Scylla and Charybdis”

Jonathan McCreedy (University of Ulster, Coleraine)
Finnegans Wake: Characters and Archetypes

Liam Lanigan (University College Dublin)
“Wandering Rocks” and the Multi-Layered City

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