The James Joyce Italian Foundation

Dipartimento di di Lingue Letterature e Culture Straniere – Università Roma Tre

Archive for the ‘News’ Category

CFP JSI vol. 23

Posted by James Joyce Italian Foundation on 28/07/2020

JOYCE PAYS, JOYSPACE (OR JOYCE AND SPACE)

Joyce studies in Italy vol. 23 (2021)

PAPER SUBMISSION DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 2, 2021

Joyce Studies in Italy, a peer-reviewed annual journal dealing with all areas of Joyce studies, invites Joycean scholars to submit papers (max 5.000 words including bibliography, no images) on the subject of Joyce and Space.

If during the Twentieth Century the idea of identity and selfhood was mainly considered as rooted in temporality, in the last few decades the spatial condition of human existence has acquired a new and profound relevance after the so-called Spatial Turn which has produced a deep change in the relationship between space, place, body and mind. Indeed, places can be conceived and experienced in a variety of ways: through fleeting yet intense bodily perceptions, mental and memory constructions, or as the result of cultural and literary inventions, so much so that distinctive and diverse places are regarded as the product of deeply felt links between people and the places they live in.

As Valérie Bénéjam and John Bishop write in Making Space in the Works of James Joyce (2011) Joyce’s concern for space “be it urban, geographic, stellar, geometrical, or optical – obviously appeared a central and idiosyncratic feature of his work”. For example, in the first chapter of the Portrait Stephen defines his position in space, according to his personal cosmology, while in Ulysses the perception of places is firstly lived through the body and bodily sensations.

Contributors are invited to explore how in Joyce’s novels space and places are constituted, perceived, known and lived in their physical, existential, memorial, textual, cognitive, imaginative or cerebral dimension, and how such perception – real or imaginary, conscious or unaware that it is – contributes to building the identities both of places and individuals, in a continuous exchange between subjective and objective, between embodied mind and places, since “being” is synonymous to “be somewhere”.

Contributions will undergo a double-blind peer review process, and selected papers will be recommended for publication in the 2021 issue of the journal.

Related topics include, but are not limited to:

Only papers which fully comply with the JSI Stylesheet and are related to the theme of the volume will be considered for submission to reviewers. Authors are kindly invited to submit their full papers to r.baronti@unicas.it by February 2, 2021.

JSI  STYLESHEET

  Length of articles: a maximum of 5,000 words, including notes.

 Quotations: Short quotations, in the body of the text. Long quotations should be presented like a normal paragraph but preceded and followed by a line jump. Any elisions or cuts made within the quotations should be indicated by […].

 Referencing: Most referencing should be done within the body of the text with the authordate-page system:  (Costello 2004: 43) Where necessary use footnotes rather than endnotes. Footnotes should be numbered consecutively. A note number should be placed before any punctuation or quotation mark. A list of Works Cited should be placed in Times New Roman (12) at the end of the text e.g. 

 Works cited: Ó Faoláin, Seán (1948). The Short Story, London: Collins. Costello, Peter (2004). “James Joyce and the remaking of Modern Ireland”, Studies, Vol. 38. No. 370: 125-138.

 References to works by Joyce should use the following conventions and abbreviations:

CP     Joyce, James. Collected Poems. New York: Viking Press, 1957.

   Joyce, James. Dubliners. ed.Robert Scholes in consultation with Richard Ellmann,.New York: Viking Press,1959; Authoritative Text, Contexts, Criticism, edited by Margot Norris, text edited by Hans Walter Gabler with Walter Hettche, New York: WW Norton and Company 2006.

E     Joyce, James. Exiles. New York: Penguin, 1973.

FW    Joyce, James. Finnegans Wake. New York: Viking Press, 1939; London: Faber and Faber, 1939. These two editions have identical pagination. Oxford World’s Classics, 2012.

GJ     Joyce, James. Giacomo Joyce, ed. Richard Ellmann. New York: Viking Press, 1968.

JJI   Ellmann, Richard. James Joyce. New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1959.

JJII     Ellmann, Richard. James Joyce. New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1982.

JJA  The James Joyce Archive, ed. Michael Groden, et al. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1977-79. See last two pages of the JJQ for guide.

 Letters I, II, III     Joyce, James. Letters of James JoyceVol. I, ed. Stuart Gilbert. New York: Viking Press, 1957; reissued with corrections 1966. Vols. II and III, ed. Richard Ellmann. New York: Viking Press, 1966.

OCPW  Joyce, James. Occasional, Critical, and Political Writing, ed. Kevin Barry. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.

 P  Joyce, James. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. The definitive text corrected from Dublin Holograph by Chester G. Anderson and edited by Richard Ellmann. New York: Viking Press, 1964; “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man”:  Text, Criticism , and Notes, ed. Chester G. Anderson. New York: Viking Press, 1968; Authoritative Text, Contexts, Criticism, edited by John Paul Riquelme, text edited by Hans Walter Gabler with Walter Hettche, New York: WW Norton and Company 2007.

SH  Joyce, James. Stephen Hero, ed. John J. Slocum and Herbert Cahoon. New York: New Directions, 1944, 1963.

SL  Joyce, James. Selected Letters of James Joyce, ed. Richard Ellmann. New York: Viking Press, 1975.

U + episode and line number Joyce, James. Ulysses ed. Hans Walter Gabler, et al. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1984, 1986. In paperback by Garland, Random House, Bodley Head, and Penguin between 1986 and 1992.

Posted in News | Leave a Comment »

James Joyce Italian Foundation Annual Conference

Posted by James Joyce Italian Foundation on 28/07/2020

Dear members of the James Joyce Italian Foundation,


due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the James Joyce Italian Foundation decided that it will not be possible to hold the XIV JJIF Conference in Rome in February 2021. It would have revolved, as planned, around the theme of Joyce and Space.


We are all very disappointed. For the first time in our history, we had to cancel our annual event to which many of you brilliantly contributed with your vision and insight in the past. We are very grateful to all of you who worked so hard over the years to make our event a special one.

For this reason, we thought a good way to make up would be to proceed with the yearly publication of our journal devoting the next issue to the planned theme of the conference. Please find in the next update the CfP with submission guidelines and stylesheet. We kindly remind you that in order to submit a paper, you need to be a member of the JJIF.


In addition, we decided to launch the Giorgio Melchiori prize for publication in the “Piccola Biblioteca Joyciana” series which has been going on for more than ten years now. Paid members of the JJIF are invited to apply by submitting a project (one page in length plus bibliography) for a short study they intend to write (110/120 pages). The winner will be asked to submit the complete manuscript by 30 April, 2021. The book will be officially launched at the XIV James Joyce Foundation Conference in Rome, in February 2022. Proposals can be sent to joyce.foundation@uniroma3.it and franca.ruggieri@uniroma3.it Deadline: October 8, 2020.


These are difficult times for us all around the world, and we hope that you will stay safe. We look forward to seeing you at a next James Joyce Italian Foundation Conference in 2022. Please check out our website and facebook page for updates.


The James Joyce Italian Foundation

Posted in News | Leave a Comment »

Memberships

Posted by James Joyce Italian Foundation on 24/04/2020

A gentle reminder for all our former members. You are warmly invited to renew your membership for 2020: as you know, your membership is what keeps “The James Joyce Italian Foundation” going!

Posted in News | Leave a Comment »

Elenco soci 2020/Member list 2020

Posted by James Joyce Italian Foundation on 23/04/2020

Posted in News | Leave a Comment »

Verbale Meeting Annuale 2020/Minute Annual Meeting 2020

Posted by James Joyce Italian Foundation on 23/04/2020

Posted in News | Leave a Comment »

CFP JSI 2020

Posted by James Joyce Italian Foundation on 15/02/2020

Joyce Studies in Italy 22 – 2020

JOYCE’OTHERS / THE OTHERS AND JOYCE

PAPER SUBMISSION DEADLINE:   May 25, 2020

Joyce Studies in Italy, a peer-reviewed annual journal dealing with all areas of Joyce studies, invites Joycean scholars and participants in the XIII James Joyce Annual Conference in Rome to submit papers (max 5.000 words including bibliography, no images) in the areas covered by the conference. Contributions will undergo a double-blind peer review process, and selected papers will be recommended for publication.

Related topics include, but are not limited to:

– Joyce and European literature

– Joyce and World literature

– Joyce’s reception across space and time

– Joyce’s radical intertextuality

– Joyce and Otherness

– Postcolonial Joyce

– Identity, othering and self-othering in Joyce

– Joyce, language and alterity

Please find attached the JSI Stylesheet.

Only papers which fully comply with the JSI Stylesheet  and are related to the theme of the volume will be considered for publication. Authors are kindly invited to submit their full papers to fabio.luppi@uniroma3.it by May 25, 2020.

JOYCE STUDIES IN ITALY

                                    STYLESHEET

  Length of articles: a maximum of 5,000 words, including notes.

 Quotations: Short quotations, in the body of the text. Long quotations should be presented like a normal paragraph but preceded and followed by a line jump. Any elisions or cuts made within the quotations should be indicated by […].

 Referencing: Most referencing should be done within the body of the text with the authordate-page system:  (Costello 2004: 43) Where necessary use footnotes rather than endnotes. Footnotes should be numbered consecutively. A note number should be placed before any punctuation or quotation mark. A list of Works Cited should be placed in Times New Roman (12) at the end of the text e.g. 

 Works cited:Ó Faoláin, Seán (1948). The Short Story, London: Collins. Costello, Peter (2004). “James Joyce and the remaking of Modern Ireland”, Studies, Vol. 38. No. 370: 125-138.

 References to works by Joyce should use the following conventions and abbreviations:

CP     Joyce, James. Collected Poems. New York: Viking Press, 1957.

D    Joyce, James. Dubliners. ed.Robert Scholes in consultation with Richard Ellmann,.New York: Viking Press,1959; Authoritative Text, Contexts, Criticism, edited by Margot Norris, text edited by Hans Walter Gabler with Walter Hettche, New York: WW Norton and Company 2006.

E     Joyce, James. Exiles. New York: Penguin, 1973.

FW    Joyce, James. Finnegans Wake. New York: Viking Press, 1939; London: Faber and Faber, 1939. These two editions have identical pagination. Oxford World’s Classics, 2012.

GJ     Joyce, James. Giacomo Joyce, ed. Richard Ellmann. New York: Viking Press, 1968.

JJI   Ellmann, Richard. James Joyce. New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1959.

JJII     Ellmann, Richard. James Joyce. New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1982.

JJA  The James Joyce Archive, ed. Michael Groden, et al. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1977-79. See last two pages of the JJQ for guide.

 Letters I, II, III     Joyce, James. Letters of James Joyce. Vol. I, ed. Stuart Gilbert. New York: Viking Press, 1957; reissued with corrections 1966. Vols. II and III, ed. Richard Ellmann. New York: Viking Press, 1966.

OCPW  Joyce, James. Occasional, Critical, and Political Writing, ed. Kevin Barry. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.

 P  Joyce, James. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. The definitive text corrected from Dublin Holograph by Chester G.Anderson and edited by Richard Ellmann. New York: Viking Press, 1964; “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man”:  Text, Criticism , and Notes, ed.Chester G.Anderson. New York: Viking Press, 1968; Authoritative Text, Contexts, Criticism, edited by John Paul Riquelme, text edited by Hans Walter Gabler with Walter Hettche, New York: WW Norton and Company 2007.

SH  Joyce, James. Stephen Hero, ed. John J. Slocum and Herbert Cahoon. New York: New Directions, 1944, 1963.

SL  Joyce, James. Selected Letters of James Joyce, ed. Richard Ellmann. New York: Viking Press, 1975.

U + episode and line number Joyce, James. Ulysses ed. Hans Walter Gabler, et al. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1984, 1986. In paperback by Garland, Random House, Bodley Head, and Penguin between 1986 and 1992.

Posted in News | Leave a Comment »

The James Joyce Italian Foundation, 26th September 2019, extraordinary meeting

Posted by James Joyce Italian Foundation on 15/11/2019

Minutes

of

the Extraordinary Annual Meeting

of

The James Joyce Italian Foundation

The extraordinary meeting of the members of The James Joyce Italian Foundation took place at the Dipartimento di Lingue, Letterature e Culture Straniere, Università Roma Tre, Sala ‘Ignazio Ambrogio’, 2nd floor, Via del Valco di San Paolo, 19, 00146 Rome. The first convocation was 26th September 2019 at 07.00 and the second 26th September 2019 at 14.00.

After verifying that there was a quorum, including proxies sent in by absent members, the meeting began with the following agenda:

1. Announcements and President’s report:

Franca Ruggieri, the President, welcomes and thanks members for their attendance. She then reads the recent message that Fritz Senn sent to Enrico Terrinoni, Serenella Zanotti and herself, telling us that he is regretfully giving up all his Joycean commitments. This includes summer schools and conferences, and so he will not take part in the Rome conference next February. Fritz adds that his decision has been made for entirely “personal and emotional reasons, following the most serious traumatic crisis of recent years”. The President and members all express their sorrow, as well as their utmost understanding and support. At the same time they express their deep honour to have him as a friend and colleague, and their gratitude to him for all the support that he has given The James Joyce Italian Foundation throughout the years. The President says that she has also received an email message from Pieter Bekker, who regrets to inform the Foundation that he is resigning from the Executive Committee. He also sends his proxy, authorizing the President to represent him and to vote on his behalf in the election of the Board, which is taking place at the present meeting. The President thanks him for his role on the Committee and for his kindness and generosity in serving the needs of the Foundation. Since the reformed rules of the Third Sector have not yet been published, the relative change to the Statute is to be postponed until the next Annual Meeting.

2. Elections to the Executive Committee:

At the last Annual meeting on 1st February 2019, the new roles of vice president and honorary president were introduced to the statute of the Foundation. The President therefore proposes to the meeting that Serenella Zanotti should be nominated vice president and Enrico Terrinoni president. Enrico Terrinoni accepts on the condition that Franca Ruggieri is appointed Honorary President. The meeting agrees, and voting is carried out by a show of hands. Unanimously, therefore, Serenella Zanotti is voted Vice President, Enrico Terrinoni President and Franca Ruggieri Honorary President. The meeting also votes unanimously by a show of hands for Roberto Baronti Marchiò and Jolanta Wawrzycka to become new members of the Executive Committee, taking the places of Franca Ruggieri and Pieter Bekker, and for Fabio Luppi to become Treasurer. The current Executive Committee therefore consists of Enrico Terrinoni (President), Serenella Zanotti (Vicepresident), Roberto Baronti Marchiò, Sonia Buttinelli, Fabio Luppi, Carla Vaglio Marengo, Jolanta Wawrzycka. The meeting votes for the seven members of the new Executive Committee by a show of hands and unanimously approves.

3. Any other business:

There is no other business

The meeting concludes at 15.30

Read and approved there and then.

The President                                                      Secretary taking minutes

Franca Ruggieri                                                      Fabio Luppi

Rome, 4th October 2019

The James Joyce Italian Foundation, 26 Settembre 2019, assemblea straordinaria

Verbale

dell’Assemblea Straordinaria di

The James Joyce Italian Foundation

L’assemblea straordinaria dei soci di The James Joyce Italian Foundation, convocata presso i locali del Dipartimento di Lingue, Letterature e Culture Straniere dell’Università Roma Tre, Sala “Ignazio Ambrogio”, II piano, Via del Valco di San Paolo, 19, 00146 Roma, in prima convocazione per il giorno 26 settembre 2019, alle ore 7, ed in seconda convocazione per il giorno  26 settembre 2019, alle ore14,00 presso gli stessi locali del Dipartimento di Lingue, Letterature e Culture Straniere dell’Università Roma Tre, si è svolta, dopo la verifica del numero legale, con il seguente ordine del giorno:

1. Comunicazioni e relazione della Presidente:

La Presidente , Franca Ruggieri, saluta e ringrazia i soci presenti. Dà quindi lettura del recente messaggio inviato a Franca Ruggieri, Enrico Terrinoni e Serenella Zanotti,  da Fritz Senn, che, con grande rammarico,  dà notizia della sua decisione di ritirarsi da tutti i suoi impegni joyciani, summer schools e convegni. Non potrà quindi partecipare al convegno di Roma il prossimo febbraio. Fritz aggiunge che la decisione è stata suggerita da “ragioni esclusivamente personali ed emotive, a seguito della crisi più seria e traumatica degli ultimi anni”. La Presidente e i soci esprimono tutto il loro rammarico per la sua assenza, come pure la loro comprensione e solidarietà per il suo stato di depressione. Allo stesso tempo dichiarano la propria gratitudine per l’onore della collaborazione di tutti questi anni con The James Joyce Italian Foudation. La Presidente dice anche di aver ricevuto un messaggio via email da Pieter Bekker, che, con rammarico, offre le proprie dimissioni dal Comitato Direttivo. Pieter invia anche una delega alla Presidente perché lo rappresenti e voti per suo conto nelle elezioni del Comitato che si terranno nel corso dell’incontro. La Presidente e i soci  lo ringraziano  per il ruolo da lui svolto nel Comitato e per la gentilezza e la generosità con cui  è venuto  incontro alle esigenze della Foundation. Dal momento che la riforma delle regole  del Terzo  Settore non è stata ancora pubblicata, le relative modifiche dello Statuto vengono rimandate alla prossima Assemblea Ordinaria Annuale.

2.  Elezioni del Comitato Direttivo:

Nell’ultima Assemblea Annuale  sono stati introdotti nello Statuto della Foundation  i nuovi ruoli di Vicepresidente e Presidente Onorario. La Presidente propone all’assemblea che Serenella Zanotti sia nominata Vicepresidente ed Enrico Terrinoni Presidente. Enrico Terrinoni accetta a condizione che Franca Ruggieri venga nominata Presidente Onorario. L’Assemblea è d’accordo e si vota per alzata di mano. All’unanimità quindi vengono votati Serenella Zanotti Vicepresidente, Enrico Terrinoni Presidente e Franca Ruggieri Presidente Onorario.

L’Assemblea vota anche all’unanimità per Roberto Baronti Marchiò e Jolanta Wawrzycka come nuovi membri  del Comitato Direttivo e per Fabio Luppi come Tesoriere.

L’attuale Comitato Direttivo è quindi così formato: Enrico Terrinoni (Presidente),  Roberto Baronti Marchiò, Sonia Buttinelli, Fabio Luppi, Carla Marengo Vaglio, Jolanta Wawrzycka, Serenella Zanotti. L’assemblea vota i sette membri del Comitato Direttivo per alzata di mano e approva all’unanimità.

3. Varie ed eventuali:

Non ci sono varie ed eventuali.

La seduta è tolta alle 15,30.

Letto e approvato seduta stante,

Presidente Franca Ruggieri

Segretario verbalizzante Fabio Luppi

Roma, 4 ottobre 2019

Posted in News | Leave a Comment »

“Joyce’s Others / The Others and Joyce”

Posted by James Joyce Italian Foundation on 13/09/2019

The XIII James Joyce Italian Foundation Conference in Rome

Conference Dates: 30-31 January 2020
DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: November 24, 2019

Keynote speakers:

  • Andrew Biswell, Metropolitan University of Manchester, President of the Anthony Burgess International Foundation
  • Andrea Binelli, University of Trento

Organisers: Franca Ruggieri, Enrico Terrinoni and Serenella Zanotti

The James Joyce Italian Foundation invites proposals for the Thirteenth Annual Conference in Rome. It will be hosted by the Department of Foreign Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the Università Roma Tre, to celebrate Joyce’s 138th birthday.

Otherness is a major feature of Joyce’s writing, in thematic, philosophical, aesthetic, political and linguistic terms. The Conference will reflect also on how other writers coming from different traditions appropriated or transfigured Joyce’s oeuvre, and how the Irish artist’s works resonate in their own writings.

We invite scholars to send proposals for a 20-minute contribution. The Conference will be the occasion to present unpublished papers and works in progress on Joyce to an international audience.

Related topics include, but are not limited to:

– Joyce and European literature

– Joyce and World literature

– Joyce’s reception across space and time

– Joyce’s radical intertextuality

– Joyce and Otherness

– Postcolonial Joyce

– Identity, othering and self-othering in Joyce

– Joyce, language and alterity

Selected papers will be published. In sending abstracts (500 words maximum in length), please attach also a short narrative bio-sketch (300 words maximum in length) to joyceconference@gmail.com. BOTH DOCUMENTS HAVE TO BE SUPPLIED IN WORD FORMAT.

The Conference includes a Joyce birthday party.

Deadline for proposals: November 24, 2019.

Accepted speakers will be notified no earlier than December 15, 2019.

On arrival, participants will be expected to sign up for membership of The James Joyce Italian Foundation (Students: 30 Euro; Individual Membership: 45 Euro; Institutions: 50 Euro; Supporting members: 70 euro).

Accepted speakers can apply for the Giorgio Melchiori Grants. Please visit the James Joyce Italian Foundation website for information: https://thejamesjoyceitalianfoundation.wordpress.com/

Convocazione dell’Assemblea Straordinaria di The James Joyce Italian Foundation

L’Assemblea  Straordinaria dei soci di The James Joyce Italian Foundation viene convocata presso i locali del Dipartimento di Lingue, Letterature e Culture Straniere dell’Università Roma Tre, Sala “Ignazio Ambrogio”, II piano, Via del Valco di San Paolo, 19, 00146 Roma, in prima convocazione per il giorno 26 settembre 2019, alle ore 7, ed in seconda convocazione per il giorno 26 settembre 2019, alle ore 14,00, con il seguente ordine del giorno:

1. Comunicazioni e relazione del Presidente

2. Rinnovo delle cariche sociali

6. Varie ed eventuali

Il Presidente

Franca Ruggieri

Rome  08.09.2019

Convocation of the Extraordinary General Meeting of The James Joyce Italian Foundation

The Extraordinary  General Meeting for members of the James Joyce Italian Foundation will be held at the Dipartimento di Lingue, Letterature e Culture Straniere dell’Università Roma Tre, Sala “Ignazio Ambrogio”, 2nd floor, Via del Valco di San Paolo, 19, 00146 Roma, firstly on  26th  September 2019  at 7 a.m. The second convocation is on 26th September 2019. at 2,00 p.m..

The agenda is as follows:

1.Announcements and President’s report

2. Elections to the Executive Committee

3.Any Other Business

Franca Ruggieri President

Rome  08.09.2019

Posted in News | Leave a Comment »

Bloomsday 2018 Genova

Posted by James Joyce Italian Foundation on 10/06/2018

BLOOMSDAY Genova
dalle 9 alle 24 sabato 16 GIUGNO 2018
Lettura dell’Ulisse di James Joyce nel Centro Storico

Per il tredicesimo anno consecutivo il 16 giugno 2018 il Centro storico di Genova ospita le peregrinazioni di Leopold Bloom, protagonista dell’Ulisse di James Joyce, e dei comprimari Stephen Dedalus, studente, e Molly Bloom, cantante adultera: Ulisse, Telemaco, Penelope. L’evento è realizzato da decine di volontari che animano i diciotto episodi dall’alba a mezzanotte in luoghi corrispondenti a quelli dublinesi, dalla Torre di Stephen (si pronuncia /stiven/!) alla camera da letto di Molly (passando da osterie, biblioteche, aule, cimiteri, strade e lupanari). E’ un’occasione unica di confrontarsi in tempo reale col capolavoro più umano del Novecento e di scoprire una Genova nota e ignota, che il 16 giugno, Bloomsday, si sovrappone a Dublino e a tutte le città (e i mari) del mondo.

Download

A cura di Massimo Bacigalupo e Genova Voci

 Traduzioni utilizzate di Giulio De Angelis (Mondadori), Enrico Terrinoni (Newton Compton), Gianni Celati (Einaudi)

Con il patrocinio di Dipartimento di Lingue e Culture Moderne – Università degli Studi di Genova,
The James Joyce Italian Foundation

Posted in News | Leave a Comment »

Conference Glossary of Exile

Posted by James Joyce Italian Foundation on 25/05/2018

A Report on The XI James Joyce Italian Foundation Conference, Rome, 31 January – 2 February 2018

Mina M. Đurić – Faculty of Philology -University of Belgrade

 

An amazing privilege to participate in The XI James Joyce Italian Foundation Conference in Rome – “James Joyce: The Joys of Exile” and an opportunity to summarize participating researches’ main ideas, presented in many rich papers and through lively discussions afterwards, opened the question about possibility of the lexicon project regarding the problems of exile in Joyce’s works. Interesting interdisciplinary approaches and interpretations of Joyce’s exile were presented during the Conference, from the perspectives of literary theory, philosophy, linguistics, geopolitics and many other fields. These intersecting perceptions provided various options for (re)creating some (re)newed terms for a conceivable James Joyce Conference Glossary of Exile, remembering this Joycean meeting, which certainly expanded the theory of exile into undiscovered hermeneutic horizons.

Art as exile

During the official opening of The Eleventh Annual James Joyce Conference in Rome, the introductory note “James Joyce: The Joys of Exile” by Franca Ruggieri, President of The James Joyce Italian Foundation, provided the framework for understanding art and literature as an exile, especially in the occurrences of the 20th century. This phenomenological reading of “exile”, through its metamorphoses from Homer and the Bible, via the histories of migrations among many cultures, to very recent situations, was based on important texts about this subject: Adorno’s Minima moralia, Said’s Reflections on Exile and Representations of the Intellectual and Cixous’s The Exile of James Joyce, reaching valuable conclusions in the perception of Joyce’s work as an exile, and Joycean writing as exilic self-expression, where homeland is a universe of intertextuality. In his illuminating welcome speech, Giorgio de Marchis, Head of Dipartimento di Lingue, Letterature e Culture Straniere, Università Roma Tre, marked the (im)possibilities of Joyce’s readings Pessoa, which can be interpreted as part of the exilic, unreal, or parallel literary history, particularly when literature is also viewed as an historical exile.

Context of exilic aesthetics

In the presentation “James Joyce and the Exilic French Imagination: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and the Development of an Aesthetics of Exile” by Jessie Alperin (Kenyon College), French Symbolist critical and poetical thoughts were examined as exilic influences in the development of the young artist and silent voice of French literary aesthetics behind the text of Joyce’s novel A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

Exile as metaphor and trope 

The paper by Jolanta Wawrzycka (Radford University), “‘The fringe of his line’: Metaphors of Exile in Joyce”, analysed the exilic discourse of Joyce’s characters, marked from poststructuralist and postcolonial perspectives of understanding the rhetorical and the poetical constructs of exile as problems of identity and its cultural determinism through the space between alienation of a certain place to the limitlessness of the inner exile. In his research “Marginality and Exile in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man”, Muhammad Ajmal (Heidelberg University) presented the differences and some innovations in the narrative forms of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, these being dictated by metaphors of psychological exile as an artistic escape from certain roles in society.

Exile in ontology of translation

In his paper “The Phantom Yes”, one of the main plenary speakers, Sam Slote (Trinity College Dublin) tackled the problems of translation as fictionalization of the text, and also focused on the editorial multiplications and textual transmissions of the relevant sign at the very end of the “Ithaca” episode in several translations, variations in new editions. In these, mistranspositions of the final “Ithaca” sign (as opposed to manuscript clarification), often changed the point of the episode. Posing the questions: if Derrida’s “qui” is always Joyce’s “yes”, how the text is retranslable when it is once translated and investigating some translation differences between English Ulysses and French Ulysse, Slote detected and, through the concepts of Walter Benjamin and Paul de Man, interpreted the translational displacements of a few more phantom yesses in the French translation of Ulysses and Derrida’s Ulysse gramophone.

Exile into new libraries

After the panels and plenaries on the first day of the Conference, the presentation of some recent publications on James Joyce was excellently organized and delivered by Franca Ruggieri, Jolanta Wawrzycka, Giuliana Bendelli, Francesca Romana Paci and Enrico Terrinoni. Among the presented books were Joyce’s Fiction and the New Rise of the Novel (Joyce Studies in Italy 19), Reading Joycean Temporalities (European Joyce Studies 27), Leggere l’Ulisse di Joyce, four volumes of Italian translation of the first and the second book of Finnegans Wake and an Italian translation of Joyce’s Pomes Penyeach, which made a really enjoyable “exile” into the new library at the Joycean Conference in Rome.

Exile through world literature

In comparison to many other (un)voluntarily expatriates in world literature, the research by Preethi Sreenivasan (Indian Institute of Technology) “Modernity, the problem of Tradition and writerly Exile; a comparative study of James Joyce and Perumal Murugan” analysed the crisis of modernity and modern masculinity in the narrative structure of exile through understanding various interpretations of culture under imperialistic circumstances, especially in transit from local via global to exiled, relating to the literary parallels of Irish and Indian modernity in the works of James Joyce and Perumal Murugan. The paper “Canon in Exile: James Joyce and Serbian Literature” by Mina Đurić (University of Belgrade) examined the creative reception of James Joyce’s opus in the works of Serbian authors, as poetic exile from the traditional canon, through the processes of the literary modernization, in the context of world literature studies.

Exilic intertextuality

The paper “Trieste-Zurich-Paris-Galway: Reading for ‘Proteus’ at Home and Abroad” by Ronan Crowley (University of Antwerp) discovered some elements of James Hardiman’s pretext in several images of the “Proteus” episode in Ulysses and in Finnegans Wake, showing the importance of exilic intertextuality and its transformation into narrative form, from some of Joyce’s readings and translations in 1912, through finalizing “Proteus” in 1917, to the time of work on Finnegans Wake in 1927.

 Expatriates in history and cultures

The paper “Being Expats Together: Joyce in Expatriate Little Magazines and Autobiographies” by Annalisa Federici (University of Rome “Sapienza”/University of Viterbo “Tuscia”) explained the poetic situation of exiles in the cosmopolity and cosmopolitism of expatriates in Parisian readings of Dublian universe in critical texts of Joycean early reception through the voices of the community of contemporaries in international literary journals. Francesco Marzano (Catholic University of the “Sacred Heart”) in the proposal “Joyce and Svevo: Mirror Portraits of Two Exiles” examined problems of the exile in the intellectual discussions between Svevo and Joyce and their writings. The paper “The British and Roman Empires, Judaism, and the History of Language in Joyce’s ‘Aeolus’” by Patrick Mullen (Queen’s University) analysed parallels between Irish and Jewish, Parnell and Moses, and British and Roman, through the history of language as the space of conflicts.

Fictionalization of the exile in other media

 After the panels and plenary on the second Conference day, in a multi-mediated experiment “Segni e disegni colorati in Finnegans Wake, raffigurazioni” the painter Paolo Colombo presented visual evocations: metamorphoses of graphic communications from numerous sciences and linguistic transformations in many cultures through the history of letters and signs, as the main concept of Joycean writing in progress and an original example of the fictionalization of Joycean exile into new mediagraphy.

Figures of exile

In his lecture “‘There were men there – and also women’: Locating the Women in Joyce’s Exiles”, Andrew Goodspeed (South East European University of Tetovo) described tensions in Exiles from the perspective of the exiled and excluded figures of women in the play, where this reading, without constituting a full feminist approach, showed the possibilities of reaching coherence in Joyce’s drama.

Genre of exile

In her paper “Exile(s) in drama and in life”, Giuliana Bendelli (Catholic University of the “Sacred Heart”) interpreted the characteristics of a suitable genre for the problems of exile, explaining why the literary form of the drama as the appropriate structure for the tension between exilic forces in the personal life of the artist and the necessity for impersonality in the text situated Joyce’s Exiles in the essential position for this type of discussion.

Heterotopic exile

Through Foucault’s explanation of heterotopia, the research “Heterotopias as Exile: a Reading of James Joyce’s Dubliners” by Edvige Pucciarelli (University of Bergamo) described the experience of writing an exile as a privileged occasion for the heterotopic transgression between different cultures.

Intermediations of exile

In her multi-mediated presentation “Joyce as Madam Butterfly: exiles in their own country”, Carla Marengo Vaglio (University of Turin) offered the relation between exilic conditions in Joyce’s works and Puccini’s famous piece. With examples from letter and novels, this analysis also focused on identity constructed from the exile and the ways of researching eloquent silence in text and music. The research “‘Cyclops’ as a Hologram of Exile” by Taura Napier (Wingate University) illustrated a verbal and hologramic “portrait of exile” through the parallax of space, time and displacement of the writer in the “Cyclops” episode. In the proposal “The Joys of Disabled Internal Exile in Finnegans Wake”, Johnnie Morey (Royal Holloway, University of London) investigated the textuality of Finnegans Wake in the intermediate connection between the inner exile of a disabled, dysmorphic subject, deformity of language and “disable”, exilic tonal music in the dodecaphony of Joyce’s novel.

Lexicography of exile

In his paper “Lexical Exile”, through the strategy of multiple and trans-translational close readings, Conference plenary speaker Fritz Senn (Zurich James Joyce Foundation) offered the term “lexile”, defining it especially in “the dislocutions” of things and words in translations of Ulysses. In the exilic simultaneity of Greek and Latin names of Odysseus in its transition through the title of Joyce’s novel, as well as in examples of words with “pt”, or in Joyce’s written diaspora of some exiled letters and in much more valuable examples from Ulysses, this rich presentation argued about ways of misplacement total (un)translatability.

Narrative strategies of exile

Discussion about the typology of the narrative strategies of exile, escape, exile at home, alienation in language from Dubliners, over A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man to Ulysses was announced by Manana Gelashvili (Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University) in her proposal “Exile as a Theme and a Narrative Strategy”. In the presentation “In the Wake of Trauma: Exploring Exilic Identity Through James Joyce’s Evasion of Narrative Fetishism”, Laura Gibbs (Goldsmiths College, University of London) questioned the narrative fetishism of Finnegans Wake’s totality from the psychological perspectives of trauma, in order to present textual recovery as (im)possible fragmental coherency of repairing fractured-identity. While Rebecca M. Lynch (Radford University) discussed components of exile in the narrative gnomonic structure in Dubliners, also from the position of trauma theory, in the paper “Dublin Through the Looking-Glass: An Analysis of ‘Eveline’ and ‘The Sisters’”, Lawrence Wang (University of Essex) tried to detect elements of queer narrativity in structure of Finnegans Wake in the research “‘It am queery!’: the Queer Failures of Exile in Finnegans Wake”. In her speech “Silence and Cunning: the Irish Exile’s Postcreative Immortality in ‘Oxen of the Sun’”, Ioana Zirra (University of Bucharest) problematized narrative exile, its mechanics and inversions, through “the postcreative reasons”, between silence and cunning from Dubliners to Finnegans Wake.

Returning through exile

In his paper “Exisle: the angst of return/Exisle: l’angoscia del ritorno”, through the interpretations of connections between Joyce and Dante, “Penelope” as code in Ulysses, theories raised by Daedalus, and an examination of the line between fiction and biography in the works of James Joyce, Gabriele Frasca (University of Salerno), one of the plenary speakers at the Conference, problematized exile situations in language and the impossibility of total escape, where it seems that the absolute is just an escape with no return, but also always problematic in its polemical context from the perspective of multi-directional Finnegans Wake.

Stylistics of exile

In her research “Style in exile. The exile of style. Giacomo Joyce”, Lia Guerra (University of Pavia) considered Giacomo Joyce as exiled artistic experience from Joyce’s style and genre experiments and the visuality of writing style in this text (especially in examples of connections between the body and the world or the hunting theme in Joyce’s early works) as a sort of exile of other arts forming web of new styles in the literary text. The paper “Corpus Stylistics and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: reading images of exiles” by Chiara Sciarrino (University of Palermo) questioned how data on exile of the corpus stylistics can reveal uncovering interpretations between Stephen Hero and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

Symposium in studies of exile

An intellectual symposium for Joyce’s 136th anniversary, in the organization of The James Joyce Italian Foundation (with assistance from the Department of Foreign Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the University of Roma Tre) was introduced with a Welcome Gathering of the Scientific and organizing committee and members of the Foundation, and followed with an annual meeting of the members of The James Joyce Italian Foundation. The pleasant tradition of infinite Joycean discussions was continued during the Reception in a wonderful atmosphere at the Embassy of Ireland in Rome, hosted by His Excellency Ambassador Colm Ó Floinn. This Conference symposium strengthened more epiphanies in conversations and mutual professional gifts of ideas for studies about Joyce and exile, as a kind of special “joys of exile”.

Theoretical approaches to exiled self

In her presentation, “‘Self exiled in upon his ego’: A lingerous longerous book of the dark of the Exiled Self”, Tamar Gelashvili (Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University) exposed aspects of the exiled self and minds of homelessness in the 20th century through different forms of exile in Joyce’s opus and especially in Finnegans Wake, where plurality of the author’s exiled self in examining the sense of exiled language is followed to the exilic selves of the readers. In the paper by Brendan Kavanagh (University of Cambridge) “‘Between two roaring worlds where they swirl, I’: Re-Situating the Exiled Self in Ulysses” the author argued that re-making of self-imposed exile in Ulysses between the physical, social and psychological relations from the viewpoint of environmental theory on Joyce’s writings about exile posed the transmission among self, environment and total circulation as an active structure for a new interpretation of the exiled self between text and environment.

Having analysed all these ideas in the works of James Joyce it can be concluded that exile seems to be a challenging theoretical problem. During this Conference some new areas of possible interpretations were opened. Based on the reflections of the Conference, it is legitimate to expect new, valuable studies of exile, in the next annual journal James Joyce: The Joys of Exile, Joyce Studies in Italy 20, which will present original perspectives of readings of “exile” in Joyce.

 

 

Posted in Conferenze/Conferences, Eventi passati/Past events, News | Leave a Comment »